Startup Index Quest | 4 – the Startup Graveyards

One reason to build a startup index is to get data out of it. At least, such a reason might seem plausible. With data, you can measure such things as the life expectancy of startups. Why not? But this means that your index needs a graveyard, that is to say, a place where inactive and closed-down startups are collected. In other words: the negative part of startup activity also needs to be indexed. The idea of organizing negative data is not new. Startups are only one of the domains where it can be applied (think of biomedical research). Since the days of the first Internet bust, startup failure data has had several incarnations. Some will remember the days of Fucked Company.

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Startup Index Quest | 3 — Zoom on Kima Ventures

In the previous installment of this series, I took a look at the disruptive approach to indexing startups adopted by AngelList. One of the industries disrupted by Naval Ravikant’s company is Venture Capital (VC). The obvious drawback of VC startup indexes is that they are restricted to companies in which VCs have a stake. They also have an obvious plus side, since inclusion in such indexes carries a signal the startup is serious. Looking at the Iliad saga — I’m talking about Xavier Niel, not Homer —, it becomes apparent that the selection process behind VC indexes can add an extra layer of information to an index. Niel’s VC arm is Kima Ventures. Currently the Kima startup portfolio has a

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Startup Index Quest | 2

After reading this long article in the New Yorker about San Francisco, I found it impossible to avoid the conclusion that the way people work and live over there could just be the perfect exemplification of Innovation Intelligence. Innovation Intelligence is what happens in a place where founders build what they really need. The reason I discovered that article in the first place is that I was researching Naval Ravikant. Within the startup world, Naval Ravikant is a hero. He qualifies. People look to him for advice and learning. He has founded several startups, but here I’ll just focus on one. Naval Ravikant has turned the utopian essence of the San Francisco innovation ecosystem into a business. And the basis of this business

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Panel Discussion on Accelerators @ HEC Advanced Technology

There are a lot of accelerators out there, and Presans has its eye on startup ecosystems. Earlier this month, the HEC Advanced Technology Group, the board of which Albert Meige is a member of, organized a conversation on the value proposition and business model of accelerators. This timely event organized by Christian Coutenceau and Silvia Carter was held simultaneously in Paris and Toulouse. Participants included: Eric TARDY, Axandus / EFI Automotive Cécile BROSSET, Head of BPI France Le Hub Jean-François GALLOÜIN, Managing Director Paris&Co Marielle Charpin, remplacing Pascal LATOUCHE, Director Orange Fab France Bruno GUTIERRES, Head of Airbus BizLab David COHEN, Managing Partner at Techstars Here are the main takeaways, courtesy of our man Dominique: Various types of accelerator There isn’t a

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Perils of the Honey Pot: Didier Roux on startup – large corporation relations

Our long-time partner, the École Polytechnique, is currently putting in big efforts on the innovation and entrepreneurship front. Because Presans owes a lot to Xavier Michel, its former Managing Director, François Plais, head of tech transfer, and Pascal Chabert, Managing Director of the Plasma Physics lab I come from, it is with pleasure that I accepted the mission to give a cycle of conferences on a topic that lies close to my interests and recent publications (Innovation Intelligence, Vers une Uberization de l’Intelligence, The Parrot Drone Story: Visionary Entrepreneur Meets Garage-Based Genius). I went for the following thematic angle: “Startups: the only possible source of innovation for large corporations?” While exchanging on the preparation of these conferences with my associate Hervé Arribart,

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