Presans Outlook 2017: Our Vision of the Future

This is how we upped our game at Presans in 2016 1. We reinforced our defining human asset: the Presans Fellows group. 2. We increased and deepened our expert pool by launching Sofia 3. 3. We developed our business by partnering with ADL on breakthrough innovation. The three megatrends we identified a year ago are still active Trend #1: An inflation and fragmentation of knowledge: new knowledge is being generated at an accelerated rhythm (for instance, five million scientific papers are published every year). In addition to this, this new knowledge is created in a multitude of entities of which the average size is decreasing. Thus, it is faster today to pick from this knowledge that has already been created

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Technological Museums Quest | 1. Getting started

Visiting the past of the future First off, here’s how Peter Thiel explains the concept of future: What makes the future distinctive and important isn’t that it hasn’t happened yet, but rather that it will be a time when the world looks different from today. In this sense, if nothing about our society changes for the next 100 years, then the future is over 100 years away. If things change radically in the next decade, then the future is nearly at hand. Humans don’t decide what to build by making choices from some cosmic catalog of options given in advance; instead, by creating new technologies, we rewrite the plan of the world. If we extend this idea to the past,

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Knowledge and innovation: a tight interdependency

Any innovator knows from experience that knowledge is as important to him or her as mortar is to a mason. Knowledge is required at every step of the innovation process. Knowledge is the key resource in the generation of an innovative concept. We speak here about all types of knowledge, not only technical knowledge but also knowledge of markets, user ergonomics, business trends, geopolitics, and so forth. When an idea is found worth pursuing, further knowledge is needed during the engineering phase to implement the concept. In parallel, another layer of knowledge is required, this one to back one of the most critical phases of innovation—the process of shaping a business model and defining a marketing strategy for the new

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Mega-trends in employment and work organization

In parallel to the third Industrial Revolution, the world of work and employment is changing rapidly. Birth of the enterprise: from a marketplace of skills to employment Blanche Segrestin and Armand Hatchuel give a very clear history of employment and of the notion of an enterprise in their book Refonder l’Entreprise. A traditional factory, such as a textile factory, before the first Industrial Revolution, differed from today’s factories in two important ways. First, people rented out their skills to the factory—the worker was a supplier. The notion of a work contract did not exist, but rather there was a real marketplace of skills driven by demand (by factories) and supply (by workers). Second, the factory relied on inventions and innovations

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Toward the third Industrial Revolution: optimizing resources

The economist Adam Smith identified three key factors for economic growth: labor, capital, and resources. While the first and second Industrial Revolutions were mostly concerned with optimizing labor productivity and capital allocation, the third Industrial Revolution is expected to focus on optimizing resources. Resources are understood in a broad sense to include land, raw materials, energy, workspace, knowledge, human resources, and so forth. First Industrial Revolution: optimizing labor The first Industrial Revolution spanned from the late eighteenth century to the early nineteenth century and was characterized by dramatic improvements in the methods of producing material goods. The steam engine, invented by Jerónimo de Ayanz y Beaumont, commercialized by Thomas Newcomen and much improved by James Watt, replaced more traditional power

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The Internet of Skills and Knowledge

This short chapter elaborates on works by Jeremy Rifkin and also Stefan Heck and Matt Rogers. They see our world entering a third Industrial Revolution. The first Industrial Revolution, which took place during the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries and was associated with steam and steel, boosted industrial productivity. The second Industrial Revolution, also called the Technological Revolution, took place during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries and was associated with urbanization and corporate creation, mainly with regard to corporate banking and research and development (R&D). We are entering a new period, during which the focus will be on sound management of resources. Although Rifkin focuses mainly on energy, we agree with the prediction of Heck and Rogers that nearly all resources

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Innovation: integrate the best state of knowledge in the world – Marc Giget

Integrate the best state of knowledge in the world To innovate is to integrate the best state of knowledge into creative products and services with the aim of improving life in society and for individuals. These three components: the knowledge, the creation and the improvement of life constitute the fundamental elements of all innovation procedures. They are, depending on the players and the periods, favored as the initiating factor.  Albert Meige and Jacques P.M. Schmitt let us run through these different approaches and sensibilities in respect of innovation procedures: technical push and innovations originating from knowledge as the prime factor, valorization of the vision of the creator, designer, entrepreneur, human- centric innovations originating from expectations, dreams and wishes of individuals.

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News from the symbiotic transfer economy front

I’ve been receiving a lot of links from Albert recently. He’s been on the road quite a bit this month, making new connections and finding out about new startups along the way. Or maybe these subjects are just always on his radar. Let’s see what we have, shall we? Companies are becoming more and more symbiotic. From job searches to politics, the signs of technological disruption are there. Nothing that would knock your socks off if you’re a regular reader of this blog. On-demand skills and talents Years after Presans, here are 2 French startups that Albert just met in San Francisco Bruce and Crafty. They are creating a Meigean transferring market in all but name – i.e. a new way to engage

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Think really big: Elon Musk

Up to the early 1970s, our vision of the future was optimistic. Mankind, divided into two rival neo-European empires, was on track to build the titanic extension into space of its terrestrial habitat. This configuration proved unstable in the sense defined by David Cosandey in his brilliant book on the rise of the West. The fact that there was not enough room on Earth to wage wars with intercontinental missiles took the intensity level of the rivalry several notches down. Then, one of the rivals proved unable to match the other empire’s feat of landing a manned spacecraft on the moon. The contest was over: going on had become pointless. The techno-scientific momentum carrying the agenda of space conquest subsequently dwindled. Other political priorities diverted resources away from the shrinking space agencies.

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Disrupting the world of politics: Interview with Arthur Muller, cofounder @ Liegey Muller Pons

Tell us about yourself and what you do. I’m one of the three cofounders of Liegey Muller Pons (LMP), which sounds like we came straight out of the 19th Century, but really is a startup that wants to change the way communications and opinion analysis are done in the field of politics. Our idea is that the best results in this domain are obtained by combining, on the one hand, a technology and big data focused method with, on the other hand, an approach based on human, face-to-face interactions with the people that need to be reached. Both need to be used together. We do this in the field of politics, where we gained a measure of recognition, but also in the corporate world. The

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