Is Buffer an Example of the Company of the Future?

In a previous article extracted from his co-authored book Innovation Intelligence, Albert Meige talked about the mega trends in employment and work organization. Among these mega trends, he mentioned flexibility in terms of both time and space in the future work organizations. Well, it seems that at least one company is already in the future. Let’s talk about Buffer ! Buffer is a software application that allows its users to manage accounts in social networks. The most interesting feature of the application is that it gives the possibility for users to schedule posts to Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin, Instagram, Pinterest and Google+. The company was created back in 2010 by Joel Gascoigne (CEO) and Leo Widrich (COO) in the UK. The two co-founders quickly

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Timing and Process of Knowledge Acquisition During an Innovation Wave

This article is the fifth and final one of the series about Innovation Waves, after Innovation Waves Associated With Invention and Discovery, Time Sequence for Innovation Waves and Their Applications : the GPS Example, How Kodak Missed The Turn…, and Knowledge Distribution During an Innovation Wave. Early strategic phase: knowledge acquisition to mitigate risks At the onset of a potentially fruitful innovation project, many companies need access to a portion of the relevant new knowledge while performing their minimum duty, roadmapping. This includes strategically evaluating the potential impact of the new invention or discovery on the company’s current business and then defining if, how, and when the company should introduce the new concept into its innovation pipeline. By definition, the invention or

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Knowledge Distribution During an Innovation Wave

This article is the fourth of the series about Innovation Waves, after Innovation Waves Associated With Invention and Discovery, Time Sequence for Innovation Waves and Their Applications : the GPS Example, and How Kodak Missed The Turn…. When an invention or discovery is born, only very few experts, researchers specialized in the specific topic, can understand it and foresee its full potential and limits. If the concept is indeed fruitful, other laboratories will try to reproduce the results and will distribute the knowledge further within a small international community of experts. This process of knowledge distribution is summarized in the table. In the early phases, the knowledge associated with the invention or discovery is not widespread, and it is generally missing within the

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How Kodak Missed The Turn…

The first and second previous articles were the beginning of a series about Innovation Waves. This article is the third of the series, and is taking the example of Kodak to illustrate the threat that innovation waves can pose to established companies. In the mid-1970s, Steven Sasson, a young electrical engineer, was hired by Eastman Kodak, at that time the world leader in silver-based photography. He was a member of a team that was incorporating electronic commands into film cameras. He was asked to evaluate a new CCD chip from Fairchild Imaging (containing ten thousand pixels!) and took the concept so far that he actually invented the first portable digital camera. The prototype was a proof of concept but was

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