Time Sequence for Innovation Waves and Their Applications : the GPS Example

In the previous article, we introduced a series of 5 articles about innovation waves, with Innovation Waves Associated With Invention and Discovery. Here is the second article of the series. As an example, let’s consider GPS, a tool for geographical positioning and that was initially created by the military. The annual rate of GPS-related innovation can be represented by GPS-related patents granted by the USPTO. As shown in the figure, the GPS-related innovation wave appears as an S-shaped curve with an acceleration peak in the late 1990s. The early phase following the invention of GPS was the lag time. The industry was contemplating GPS, a new push technology, with prudence. Eventually, its successful introduction into plane, ship, and finally automobile navigation

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Innovation Waves Associated With Invention and Discovery

This article is the first of a new series of 5 articles about Innovation Waves. It introduces the topic with Innovation Waves Associated With Invention and Discovery. Looking at innovation from a historical perspective reveals that the long series of innovative products generated by the industrial world have come in a progression of waves, with each wave originating from an invention or a discovery. The following are a few examples of inventions and discoveries that have changed drastically the world in which we live today: Liquid-crystal display (LCD) technology (including electro-optics), first a scientific discovery then the basis for products such as flat-panel LCD displays and LCD projectors Signal compression, first as mathematical algorithms then the basis for products such as music

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Innovation Cycle and Risk Management

In the previous articles of this series, we wrote about Internal Knowledge, Time Horizon, Frontier Sciences, Academic Knowledge, Learning and Experience, and Parallel Worlds.  Here we deal with Risk Management. Innovation as a risky venture Innovation is the process of pushing a new concept toward its implementation in the society with the objective of creating value. At least in the early phase of its process, innovation is always an endeavor with a low probability of success. Innovation is risky, because it explores paths that have not yet been visited or mapped and in which the presence and location of treacherous obstacles have not been recorded. Uncertainty is the key, unavoidable aspect of innovation. The economics of innovation can only be

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Interview with Albert Meige, CEO and Enchanter @ Presans

Albert Meige is the CEO of Presans and the Director of the EMBA Telecom School of Management. His entrepreneurial experience in the field of industrial innovation led him to formulate a bold vision of the evolution of the organization of work. According to him, the stakes are no longer open innovation, but the open organization. Q: Can you tell us about the path that led you to become the person you are today, CEO / Enchanter at Presans and Director of an EMBA program? AM: First of all Jacques, let me tell you that I was not too excited about your proposal to interview me. On the one hand, despite the fact that I do a lot of public speaking, when

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Knowledge for Innovation: Parallel Worlds

In the previous articles of this series, we wrote about Internal Knowledge, Time Horizon, Frontier Sciences, Academic Knowledge and Learning and Experience.  Here we deal with Parallel Worlds. Parallel worlds, shown in the figure as a box between learning and experience and the company’s in-house knowledge, contain industrial knowledge far from the standard knowledge base of the company’s own industry. The piece of knowledge may be unexpected and not present in the existing knowledge base of the company’s industry but applicable to the company’s situation. For example, a metal packaging company trying to conceive a fraud-resistant container for medicine will have a good chance of being inspired by exploring knowledge in the banknote and credit card printing industry. This is a

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