Startup Index Quest | 4 – the Startup Graveyards

One reason to build a startup index is to get data out of it. At least, such a reason might seem plausible. With data, you can measure such things as the life expectancy of startups. Why not? But this means that your index needs a graveyard, that is to say, a place where inactive and closed-down startups are collected. In other words: the negative part of startup activity also needs to be indexed. The idea of organizing negative data is not new. Startups are only one of the domains where it can be applied (think of biomedical research). Since the days of the first Internet bust, startup failure data has had several incarnations. Some will remember the days of Fucked Company.

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The Game-Changer Mindset

A company’s corporate culture prescribes to its members what to believe, what to prefer, what to do and how to do it. Such a set of prescriptions is based on the example of leaders, on the traditions of the past, and on bureaucratic rules. It follows that changing a corporate culture is a complex undertaking fraught with perils. In addition, given that successful firms tend to evolve a culture that is adapted to their industry, changing that culture should not be attempted on frivolous grounds. On the other hand, companies stand in front of massive waves of disruption that threaten to wipe out their established positions. Their long-term dominance or survival hinges upon their ability to go beyond incremental innovation,

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The Chief Innovation Officer should be in charge of new territories. Not more. Not less.

A analysis with Google Trends on “Chief Innovation Officer” shows an increasing interest starting in 2010. The term was actually coined and described by Miller and Morris in 1998, but it seems to have only received interest in the past 4-5 years or so. While the Chief Innovation Officer’s function is becoming increasingly strategic, its description is still in its infancy and varies among companies. In the following we will see why the perimeter of the Chief Innovation Officer should be new territories. Not more. Not less. This article is based on our book Innovation Intelligence (2015), written after interviewing dozens of Chief Innovation Officers and other C-level functions of large companies. Chief Innovation Officer: a role in its infancy

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In 2033, you’ll be transferring, not working

2033. Imagine that we are in 2033. Are you there? That’s not 2033! Here, let me give you a hand. In 2033, we still won’t have hoverboards, or flying cars. However, in 2033, more and more restaurants will use 3D printing to print food!?! In 2033, autonomous cars will be everywhere. In 2033, 80% of medical procedures will be automated. In 2033, 50% of the largest companies we know today will have disappeared. That’s it! Are you ready? Let’s add a couple of elements. The date is May 15, 2033. It is 10:27 AM. The woman you see here is Maya; she is a real person. She turns 26 in a few weeks and just woke up. She worked late

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The Uberization of “Heavy” Industry: Some Thoughts on the Oil & Gas Case

A couple of weeks ago, I got invited by the Director of Intellectual Property (IP) of a large international corporation in the energy sector to give a conference on innovation and digitalization. While I am fairly well-versed in both topics, this invitation confronts me with two challenges: (1) Connecting these themes to the intellectual property function, on which I hardly know anything. (2) Drawing the implications of stories we are all starting to become familiar with, such as Netflix, Airbnb, Tesla and Uber, as they apply to B2B industrial players, in a sector characterized by immense capital investments. In the following, “heavy industry” refers to this sector. Is the uberization of heavy industry conceivable? That is the question that I shall examine. I

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