Matching algorithm and process fail to engage solvers into problem solving

How can we ensure that the Need is broadcast to the right potential experts, without narrowing or broadening too much the broadcast and and do we ensure that we manage to engage these potential experts? Tradeoff between targeting and large broadcast To maximize the probability to solve a problem, a tradeoff has to be found between strong targeting of the solvers and large broadcast: even assuming a large base of solvers, it is merely impossible to guaranty their engagement into problem solving. To engage solvers, one needs to contact them (for example by email) to “advertize” the problem. Given a certain problem, who should be contacted? All the solvers in all the fields? Solvers whose online profile shows a certain

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Registration Yields a Weak Number of Solvers

As an intermediary, how can you constantly find new and interested solvers around the world (i.e. people ready to propose solutions to technological problems)? You need efficient incentives to attract them on your platform, to make them subscribe, to engage them in solving problems and to release intellectual property (IP). Registration has a direct negative impact on the number of solvers, although it may be, in principle, a nice way to select supposedly motivated solvers. Few experts register on crowdsourcing platforms How many experts go and register on crowdsourcing platforms? 10,000? 100,000? Most famous platforms hardly reach 300,000 solvers, which is far less than the tens of millions of experts in the world. In addition, figures claimed by many companies

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Where Open Innovation Crowdsourcing Platforms Fail

The way Open Innovation crowdsourcing platforms work is rather simple, at least in principle: they help companies to match a problem or a need to an existing solution or to somebody able to solve the problem. Underlying requirements are (i) a large pool of problems, (ii) a large pool of solvers[1] and (iii) a good matching algorithm or process. In addition, the lubricant for all that to work is trust, which here means careful management of confidentiality and intellectual property. However, behind this simple idea, a lot of theoretical and practical difficulties have emerged from a decade of experimentations. The 3 upcoming articles on Open-Your-Innovation.com detail these points: REGISTRATION YIELDS A WEAK NUMBER OF SOLVERS MATCHING ALGORITHM AND PROCESS FAIL

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Getting help with open innovation

Dr Letizia Mortara, Research Associate at the Institute for Manufacturing’s Centre for Technology Management (University of Cambridge) has just released a new report on Open Innovation. The idea is that the new paradigm of Open Innovation is an innovation itself and that it needs innovative tools to be deployed: it  demands a new set of capabilities which many businesses do not possess. Companies looking for help with open innovation will find various organizations out there. These organizations have come to be known as “innovation intermediaries”. This report aims to help companies select the most effective source of help with open innovation. The report, entitled “Getting help with open innovation” is extremely interesting and exhaustive. It addresses some of the following

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A Novel Approach for Open Innovation Platforms : Multistep Dynamic Expert Sourcing : Introduction

Open Innovation is necessary Resources in the traditional ecosystem of a company appear to be insufficient for many industrial or business needs. Open Innovation is the paradigm according to which companies need to use external ideas, knowledge & technologies to advance their businessi. In particular, Open Innovation allows accelerating innovation by using most relevant external expertise and maximizes cross-fertilization between industries and between disciplines. There is a need for intermediaries In the context of Open Innovation, there is an increasing need of intermediaries to facilitate the connection between companies and external resources. Various types of intermediaries exist. (i) Traditional intermediaries, such as Technology Transfer Offices, clusters, boundary agentsetc., are not web-based[1] and have been around for decades. (ii) More recently,

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